What is Wet Rot?

Know the wet rot facts

what is wet rot & how is it caused?

Put simply, wet rot is timber that is decaying naturally in the presence of high moisture levels.

Wet rot is, therefore, a general term used to describe a variety of fungal species responsible for wood rot, the most common being ‘Cellar Fungus’ (Coniophora Puteana). 

Any timber exposed to excess moisture can provide the ideal breeding ground for wet rot spores, meaning wet rot can occur for a number of reasons. It could be that you have a leaky roof, burst pipes, a washing machine that has not been connected up correctly, a leaking bath... The possibilities are endless.  Whatever the reason, if timber has been exposed to damp for a sustainable period of time, the outcome is generally a form of wet rot.

Identify Wet Rot

What does wet rot look like?

More pictures of wet rot

find out more about wet rot

Wet rot can affect almost any type of timber throughout the home so it can often be difficult to identify if you are not an expert. It is also completely different to the more serious timber condition dry rot, so it is important that the two are never confused. 

Identify Wet Rot

There are several tell tale signs of wet rot. Make sure you can identify this property problem.

How to identify Wet Rot

Wet Rot v Dry Rot

Most people do not know the wet rot/dry rot difference. Make sure you know the facts.

Wet Rot v Dry Rot

Contact our wet rot experts

If you want to talk to a wet rot treatment expert, call Wise Property Care on 0800 65 22 678 or contat us online using our contact form. Our expert team will be more than happy to help with any questions you might have.

Contact Wise Property Care

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